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SQ3R Sheet Printable! 2005 Inspirational Quotes & Photos 2005 Inspirational Stories 2005 Daily Writing Prompts Expected Behaviors of a Good Listener  

 

SQ3R  Worksheets To use in your Classroom

Feel free to print these out and use,
or change them to fit your own preferences

(Print pages 1-2)

Name:  _________________________ Date:  _______________________
SURVEYRecord important titles, subtitles, bold-faced words, captions, etc.
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QUESTION
Write out at least 3 "Who, What, When, Where, Why, or How" questions based on your survey.
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READAs you read, look for and write down answers to the questions from above.
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RECITEAfter reading, record highlights of important points you've just read and take a few additional notes (in your own words, of course!)
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REVIEWNow apply what you've learned in a new way.
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A Year of Quotes and Photos
From Our Newsletters
2005


 


"Be always at war with your vices, 
at peace with your neighbors,
and let each new year find you 
a better man."

     ~ Benjamin Franklin

"Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things."

     ~ Robert Brault


"It is Christmas in the heart that puts Christmas in the air."

     ~ W.T. Ellis

"Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, everything is softer and more beautiful"

     ~ Norman Vincent Peale


"Look at everything as though you were seeing it either for the first or last time."

     ~ Betty Smith

"Not what we say about our blessings, but how we use them, is the true measure of our thanksgiving."

     ~ W.T. Purkiser

"The whole art of teaching is only the art of awakening the natural curiosity of young minds for the purpose of satisfying it afterwards."

     ~ Anatole France

“If you think education is expensive,
try ignorance!"

     ~ Andy McIntyre

"Youth is like spring, an over praised season more remarkable for biting winds than genial breezes.  Autumn is the mellower season, and what we lose in flowers we more than gain in fruits."

     ~ Samuel Butler

"The only things worth learning are the things you learn after you know it all."   

     ~ Harry S. Truman

"Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterward."  

     ~
Chinese Proverb

“Whether you think you can or think you can't -- you are right.”

     ~ Henry Ford

"Man's mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions."  

     ~
Oliver Wendell Holmes

"It takes as much stress to be a success as it does to be a failure."  

     ~
Emilio James Trujillo

"The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them." 

     ~
Mark Twain

"If you want to get the best out of a man, you must look for the best that is in him." 

     ~
Bernard Haldane

"Learning is an ornament in prosperity, a refuge in adversity, and a provision in old age."   

     ~ Aristotle

"The great aim of education is not knowledge but action." 

     ~
Herbert Spencer

"It is the province of knowledge to speak, and it is the privilege of wisdom to listen."   

     ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

“The more extensive a man's knowledge of what has been done, the greater will be his power of knowing what to do.” 

     ~ Benjamin Disraeli


A Year of Stories
From Our Newsletters
2005

2005 was our inaugural year, and to celebrate our first year anniversary, we've presented you, our valued readers, with the collection of inspiration stories from all of our 2005 newsletters.

We hope you will enjoy these, and you might even have a use for them in your classroom.  You can scroll down through the stories, or use the quicklinks below to reach a story directly:

 

Cracked Pots
(From our February #2 Issue)

A water bearer in India had two large pots, each hung on the ends of a pole which he carried across his neck. One of the pots had a crack in it, while the other pot was perfect and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walk from the stream to the house, the cracked pot arrived only half full. For a full two years this went on daily, with the bearer delivering only one and a half pots full of water to his house.

Of course, the perfect pot was proud of its accomplishments, perfect for which it was made. But the poor cracked pot was shamed of its own imperfection, and miserable that it was able to accomplish only half of what it had been made to do.

After 2 yrs of what it perceived to be a bitter failure, it spoke to the water bearer one day by the stream. "I am ashamed of myself, and I want to apologize to you. I have been able to deliver only half my load because this crack in my side causes water to leak out all the way back to your house. Because of my flaws, you have to do all of this work, and you don't get full value from your efforts," the pot said.

The bearer said to the pot, "Did you notice that there were flowers only on your side of the path, but not on the other pot's side? That's because I have always known about your flaw, and I planted flower seeds on your side of the path, and every day while we walk back, you've watered them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to grace the house."

Moral: Each of us has our own unique flaws. We're all cracked pots, but it's the cracks and flaws we each have that make our lives together so very interesting and rewarding. You've just got to take each person for what they are, and look for the good in them. Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.

Remember to appreciate all the different people in your life - including all your crackpot friends!!!!!

 

Leadership Lessons Learned from Canadian Geese
(From our March #1 Issue)

Sometimes we can learn important lessons in leadership from observing nature.

As each bird flaps its wings by flying in a V formation, the whole flock adds 71% flying range than each bird flew alone. Lesson 1 People who share a common direction and sense of community can get where they are going quicker and easier because they are traveling on the thrust of one another.
Whenever a goose falls out of formation, it quickly gets back into formation to take advantage of the "lifting power" of the bird immediately in front. Lesson 2 If we have as much sense as a goose we will step into formation with those who are headed where we want to go.
When a lead goose gets tired, it rotates back into the formation and another goose flies at the point position. Lesson 3 It pays to take turns doing the hard tasks and sharing leadership, independent with each other.
The geese in formation honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up their speed. Lesson 4 We need to make sure that our honking from behind is encouraging ..... not something else.
When a goose gets sick or wounded or shot down, two geese drop out of the formation to follow and protect. They stay until the goose is able to fly again or dies. Lesson 5 If we have as much sense as the geese, we'll stand by each other in the same manner.

 

Leadership Lessons In Nature:
 Only the Buzzards Win a Fight
(From our March #2 Issue)

Sometimes we can learn important lessons in leadership from observing nature.  The animals in this fable finally understand that neither one will really win in a fight.

A pointed fable is told about a young lion and a cougar. Both thirsty, the animals arrived at their usual water hole at the same time. They immediately began to argue about who should satisfy their thirst first.

The argument became heated, and each decided he would rather die than give up the privilege of being first to quench his thirst. As they stubbornly confronted each other, their emotions turned to rage. Their cruel attacks on each other were suddenly interrupted. They both looked up. Circling overhead
was a flock of vultures waiting for the loser to fall. Quietly, the two beasts turned and walked away. The thought of being devoured was all they needed to end their quarrel.

 

 

 

Adversity: The Grindstone of Life

(From our April #2 Issue)

Adversity is the grindstone of life. Intended to polish you up, adversity also has the ability to grind you down. The impact and ultimate result depend on what you do with the difficulties that come your way. Consider the phenomenal achievements of people experiencing adversity.
Beethoven composed his greatest works after becoming deaf. Sir Walter Raleigh wrote the History of the World during a thirteen year imprisonment. If Columbus had turned back, no one could have blamed him, considering the constant adversity he endured. Of course, no one would have remembered him either.

Abraham Lincoln achieved greatness by his display of wisdom and character during the devastation of the Civil War. Luther translated the Bible while enduring confinement in the Castle of Wartburg. Under a sentence of death and during twenty years in exile, Dante wrote the Divine Comedy. John Bunyan wrote Pilgrim's Progress in a Bedford jail.

Finally, consider a more recent example. Mary Groda-Lewis endured sixteen years of illiteracy because of unrecognized dyslexia, was committed to a reformatory on two different occasions, and almost died of a stroke while bearing a child. Committed to going to college, she worked at a variety of odd jobs to save money, graduated with her high school equivalency at eighteen, was named Oregon's outstanding Upward Bound student, and finally entered college. 

Determined to become a doctor, she faced fifteen medical school rejections until Albany Medical College finally accepted her. In 1984, Dr. Mary Groda-Lewis, at thirty-five, graduated with honors to fulfill her dream.

Adversity - the grindstone of life. Will it grind you down or polish you up? 

 

 

 

"This Is Good!"

(From our May #1 Issue)

The story is told of a king in Africa who had a close friend with whom he grew up. The friend had a habit of looking at every situation that ever occurred in his life (positive or negative) and remarking, "This is good!"

One day the king and his friend were out on a hunting expedition. The friend would load and prepare the guns for the king. The friend had apparently done something wrong in preparing one of the guns, for after taking the gun from his friend, the king fired it and his thumb was blown off.

Examining the situation the friend remarked as usual, "This is good!"

To which the king replied, "No, this is NOT good!" and proceeded to send his friend to jail.

About a year later, the king was hunting in an area that he should have known to stay clear of. Cannibals captured him and took them to their village. They tied his hands, stacked some wood, set up a stake and bound him to the stake. As they came near to set fire to the wood, they noticed that the king was missing a thumb. Being superstitious, they never ate anyone that was less than whole. So untying the king, they sent him on his way.

As he returned home, he was reminded of the event that had taken his thumb and felt remorse for his treatment of his friend.

He went immediately to the jail to speak with his friend. "You were right," he said, "it was good that my thumb was blown off."

And he proceeded to tell the friend all that had just happened. "And so I am very sorry for sending you to jail for so long.  It was bad for me to do this." 

"No," his friend replied, "This is good!"

"What do you mean, 'This is good'? How could it be good that I sent my friend to jail for a year?"

"If I had NOT been in jail, I would have been with you." 

 

 

"Powerful Words"

(From our June #1 Issue)

A Short Course in Human Relations

 

The six most important words:  I admit that I was wrong. 
The five most important words: You did a great job. 
The four most important words: What do you think? 
The three most important words: Could you please. . . 
The two most important words: Thank you. 
The most important word: We
The least important word: I

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Twenty Dollars"

(From our June #2 Issue)

A Short Course in Human Relations

 
A well known speaker started off his seminar by holding up a $20 bill. In the room of 200, he asked. "Who would like this $20 bill?"

Hands started going up. He said, "I am going to give this $20 to one of you - but first, let me do this." 

He proceeded to crumple the 20 dollar note up. He then asked. "Who still wants it?" Still the hands were up in the air.

"Well," he replied, "what if I do this?" He dropped it on the
ground and started to grind it into the floor with his shoe. He picked it up, now crumpled and dirty. "Now, who still wants it?"

Still the hands went into the air.

"My friends, you have all learned a very valuable lesson. No
matter what I did to the money, you still wanted it because it did not decrease in value. It was still worth $20.

Many times in our lives, we are dropped, crumpled, and ground into the dirt by the decisions we make and the circumstances that come our way. We feel as though we are worthless; but no matter what happened or what will happen, you will never lose your value. 

Dirty or clean, crumpled or finely creased, you are still
priceless to those who love you. The worth of our lives comes, not in what we do or who we know, but by ...WHO WE ARE.

You are special - don't ever forget it."

 

"The Mountain Story"

(From our July #1 Issue)

YOUR LIFE IS NOT A COINCIDENCE. IT'S A REFLECTION OF YOU!

A son and his father were walking on the mountains.  Suddenly, his son falls, hurts himself and screams: "AAAhhhhhhhhhhh!!!" To his surprise, he hears the voice repeating, somewhere in the mountain: "AAAhhhhhhhhhhh!!!"

Curious, he yells: "Who are you?" He receives the answer: "Who are you?"

Angered at the response, he screams: "Coward!" He receives the answer: "Coward!"

He looks to his father and asks: "What's going on?" The father smiles and says: "My son, pay attention." And then he screams to the mountain: "I admire you!" The voice answers: "I admire you!"

Again the man screams: "You are a champion!" The voice answers: "You are a champion!"

The boy is surprised, but does not understand. Then the father explains: "People call this ECHO, but really this is LIFE. It gives you back everything you say or do. Our life is simply a reflection of our actions. If you want more love in the world, create more love in your heart. If you want more competence in your team, improve your competence.

This relationship applies to everything, in all aspects of life;  Life will give you back everything you have given to it."


YOUR LIFE IS NOT A COINCIDENCE. IT'S A REFLECTION OF YOU!

 

 

"Big Rocks"

(From our July #2 Issue)

What are the 'Big Rocks' in your life?

A while back I was reading about an expert on subject of time management. One day this expert was speaking to a group of business students and, to drive home a point, used an illustration those students will never forget.

As this man stood in front of the group of high-powered overachievers he said, "Okay, time for a quiz."

Then he pulled out a one-gallon, wide-mouthed mason jar and set it on a table in front of him. Then he produced about a dozen fist-sized rocks and carefully placed them, one at a time, into the jar.

When the jar was filled to the top and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, "Is this jar full?" Everyone in the class said, "Yes."

Then he said, "Really?" He reached under the table and pulled out a bucket of gravel. Then he dumped some gravel in and shook the jar causing pieces of gravel to work themselves down into the spaces between the big rocks.

Then he asked the group once more, "Is the jar full?"

By this time the class was onto him. "Probably not," one of them answered. "Good!" he replied.

He reached under the table and brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in and it went into all the spaces left between the rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the question, "Is this jar full?"

"No!" the class shouted. Once again he said, "Good!" Then he grabbed a pitcher of water and began to pour it in until the jar was filled to the brim. Then he looked up at the class and asked, "What is the point of this illustration?"

One eager beaver raised his hand and said, "The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard, you can always fit some more things into it!"

"No," the speaker replied, "that's not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is: If you don't put the big rocks in first, you'll never get them in at all."

What are the 'big rocks' in your life?

A project that YOU want to accomplish? Time with your loved ones? Your faith, your education, your finances? A cause? Teaching or mentoring others?

Remember to put these BIG ROCKS in first or you'll never get them in
at all. ---

So, tonight or in the morning when you are reflecting on this short
story, ask yourself this question: What are the 'big rocks' in my life
or business? 

Then, put those in your jar first.

 

"Attitude"

By Charles Swindoll

(From our August #1 Issue)

We each are in control of our Attitudes.

The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. 

Attitude to me is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than success, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, gift, or skill. It will make or break a company...a church...a home. 

The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. 

We cannot change our past...we cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. 

The only thing we can do is play on the string we have, and that is our attitude. 

I am convinced that life is 10 percent what happens to me and 90 percent how I react to it. And so it is with you... we are in charge of our attitudes. 

 

 

"Two Frogs"

(From our Back to School #1 Issue)

The Power of Words:  Encouragement.

A group of frogs were traveling through the woods, and two of them fell into a deep pit. All the other frogs gathered around the pit.

When they saw how deep the pit was, they told the two frogs that they were as good as dead.

The two frogs ignored the comments and tried to jump up out of the pit with all of their might. The other frogs kept telling them to stop, that they were as good as dead. Finally, one of the frogs took heed to what the other frogs were saying and gave up. He fell down and died.

The other frog continued to jump as hard as he could. Once again, the crowd of frogs yelled at him to stop the pain and just die.

He jumped even harder and finally made it out. When he got out, the other frogs said, "Did you not hear us?" The frog explained to them that he was deaf. He thought they were encouraging him the entire time.


This story teaches two lessons:

1. There is power of life and death in the tongue.  An encouraging word to someone who is down can lift them up and help them make it through the day.

2. A destructive word to someone who is down can be what it takes to kill them. Speak life to those who cross your path. The power of words....it is sometimes hard to understand that an encouraging word can go such a long way. Anyone can speak words that tend to rob another of the spirit to continue in difficult times.

 

 

"Who You Are Makes A Difference"

(From our Back to School #2 Issue)

Someone in your life makes a difference.

A teacher in New York decided to honor each of her seniors in high school by telling them the difference they each made. She called each student to the front of the class, one at a time. First she told each of them how they had made a difference to her and the class. Then she presented each of them with a blue ribbon imprinted with gold letters, which read, "Who I Am Makes a Difference."

Afterwards the teacher decided to do a class project to see what kind of impact recognition would have on a community. She gave each of the students three more ribbons and instructed them to go out and spread this acknowledgment ceremony. Then they were to follow up on the results, see who honored whom and report back to the class in about a week.

One of the boys in the class went to a junior executive in a nearby company and honored him for helping him with his career planning. He gave him a blue ribbon and put it on his shirt. Then he gave him two extra ribbons and said, "We're doing a class project on recognition, and we'd like you to go out find somebody to honor, give them a blue ribbon, then give them the extra blue ribbon so they can acknowledge a third person to keep this acknowledgment ceremony going. Then please report back to me and tell me what happened."

Later that day the junior executive went in to see his boss, who had been noted, by the way, as being kind of a grouchy fellow. He sat his boss down and he told him that he deeply admired him for being a creative genius.

The boss seemed very surprised. The junior executive asked him if he would accept the gift of the blue ribbon and would he give him permission to put it on him. His surprised boss said, "Well, sure." The junior executive took the blue ribbon and placed it right on his boss's jacket above his heart.

As he gave him the last extra ribbon, he said, "Would you do me a favor? Would you take this extra ribbon and pass it on by honoring somebody else? The young boy who first gave me the ribbons is doing a project in school and we want to keep this recognition ceremony going and find out how it affects people."

That night the boss came home to his 14-year-old son and sat him down. He said, "The most incredible thing happened to me today. I was in my office and one of the junior executives came in and told me he admired me and gave me a blue ribbon for being a creative genius. Imagine. He thinks I'm a creative genius. Then he put this blue ribbon that says: 'Who I Am Makes a Difference', on my jacket above my heart. He gave me an extra ribbon and asked me to find somebody else to honor. As I was driving home tonight, I started thinking about whom I would honor with this ribbon and I thought about you."

"I want to honor you. My days are really hectic and when I come home I don't pay a lot of attention to you. Sometimes I scream at you for not getting good enough grades in school and for your bedroom being a mess, but somehow tonight, I just wanted to sit here and, well, just let you know that you do make a difference to me. Besides your mother, you are the most important person in my life. You're a great kid and I love you!"

The startled boy started to sob and sob, and he couldn't stop crying. His whole body shook. He looked up at his father and said through his tears, "Dad, earlier tonight I sat in my room and wrote a letter to you and Mom explaining why I had killed myself and asking you to forgive me. I was going to commit suicide tonight after you were asleep. I just didn't think that you cared at all. The letter is upstairs. I don't think I need it after all."

His father walked upstairs and found a heartfelt letter full of anguish and pain. The envelope was addressed, "Mom and Dad."

The boss went back to work a changed man. He was no longer a grouch but made sure to let all his employees know that they made a difference. The junior executive helped several other young people with career planning and never forgot to let them know that they made a difference in his life - one being the boss's son.

And the young boy and his classmates learned a valuable lesson. Who you are DOES make difference.

 

 


"Lessons From an Oyster"

(From our October #1 Issue)

Dealing with those things that get 'under our skin'.

There once was an oyster
Whose story I tell,
Who found that some sand
Had got into his shell.

It was only a grain,
but it gave him great pain.
For oysters have feelings
Although they're so plain.

Now, did he berate
the harsh workings of fate
That had brought him
To such a deplorable state?

Did he curse at the government,
Cry for election,
And claim that the sea should
Have given him protection?

'No,' he said to himself
As he lay on a shell,
Since I cannot remove it,
I shall try to improve it.

Now the years have rolled around,
As the years always do,
And he came to his ultimate
Destiny ­ stew.

And the small grain of sand
That had bothered him so
Was a beautiful pearl
All richly aglow.

Now the tale has a moral,
for isn't it grand
What an oyster can do
With a morsel of sand?

What couldn't we do
If we'd only begin
With some of the things
That get under our skin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Creating Opportunity"
By Jim Rohn

(From our October #2 Issue)

Dealing with those things that get 'under our skin'.

An enterprising person is one who comes across a pile of scrap metal and sees the making of a wonderful sculpture. An enterprising person is one who drives through an old decrepit part of town and sees a new housing development. An enterprising person is one who sees opportunity in all areas of life.

To be enterprising is to keep your eyes open and your mind active. It's to be skilled enough, confident enough, creative enough and disciplined enough to seize opportunities that present themselves... regardless of the economy.

A person with an enterprising attitude says, "Find out what you can before action is taken." Do your homework. Do the research. Be prepared. Be resourceful. Do all you can in preparation of what's to come.

Enterprising people always see the future in the present. Enterprising people always find a way to take advantage of a situation, not be burdened by it. And enterprising people aren't lazy. They don't wait for opportunities to come to them, they go after the opportunities. Enterprise means always finding a way to keep yourself actively working toward your ambition.

Enterprise is two things. The first is creativity. You need creativity to see what's out there and to shape it to your advantage. You need creativity to look at the world a little differently. You need creativity to take a different approach, to be different.

What goes hand-in-hand with the creativity of enterprise is the second requirement: the courage to be creative. You need courage to see things differently, courage to go against the crowd, courage to take a different approach, courage to stand alone if you have to, courage to choose activity over inactivity.

And lastly, being enterprising doesn't just relate to the ability to make money. Being enterprising also means feeling good enough about yourself, having enough self worth to want to seek advantages and opportunities that will make a difference in your future. And by doing so you will increase your confidence, your courage, your creativity and your self-worth, your enterprising nature.

 


"If We Would Have Hurried"
By Billy Rose, Stories from the Heart

(From our November #1 Issue)

"Take it easy ... you'll last longer. And you'll enjoy life so much more,"

There once was a fellow who, with his dad, farmed a little piece of land. Several times a year they would load up the old ox-drawn cart with vegetables and go into the nearest city to sell their produce. Except for their name and patch of ground, father and son had little in common. The old man believed in taking it easy. The boy was usually in a hurry -- the go-getter type.

One morning, bright and early, they hitched up the ox to the loaded cart and started on the long journey. The son figured that if they walked faster, kept going all day and night, they'd make the market by early the next morning. So he kept prodding the ox with a stick, urging the beast to get a move on.

"Take it easy, son" said the old man. "You'll last longer."

"But if we get to the market ahead of the others, we'll have a better chance of getting good prices," argued the son.

No reply. Dad just pulled his hat down over his eyes and fell asleep on the seat. Itchy and irritated, the young man kept goading the ox to walk faster. His stubborn pace refused to change.

Four hours and four miles down the road, they came to a little house. The father woke up, smiled and said, "Here's your uncle's place. Let's stop in and say "hello."

"But we've lost an hour already," complained the hotshot.

"Then a few more minutes won't matter. My brother and I live so close, yet we see each other so seldom," the father answered slowly.

The boy fidgeted and fumed while the two old men laughed and talked away almost an hour. On the move again, the man took his turn leading the ox. As they approached a fork in the road, the father led the ox to the right.

"The left is the shorter way," said the son.

"I know it," replied the old man, "but this way is so much prettier."

"Have you no respect for time?: the young man asked impatiently.

"Oh, I respect it very much! That's why I like to look at beauty and enjoy each moment to the fullest."

The winding path led through graceful meadows, wildflowers and along a rippling stream - all of which the young man missed as he churned within, preoccupied and boiling with anxiety. He didn't even notice how lovely the sunset was that day.

Twilight found them in what looked like a huge, colorful garden. The old man breathed in the aroma, listened to the bubbling brook, and pulled the ox to a halt. "Let's sleep here," he sighed.

"This is the last trip I'm taking with you," snapped his son. "You're more interested in watching sunsets and smelling flowers then in making money!"

"Why, that's the nicest thing you've said in a long time," smiled the dad. A couple of minutes later he was snoring - as his boy glared back at the stars. The night dragged slowly, the son was restless.

Before sunrise the young man hurriedly shook the father awake. They hitched up and went on. About a mile down the road they happened upon another farmer - a total stranger - trying to pull his cart out of a ditch.

"Let's give him a hand," whispered the old man.

"And lose more time?" the boy exploded.

"Relax, son ... you might be in a ditch yourself. We need to help others in need - don't forget that." The boy looked away in anger.

It was almost eight o'clock that morning by the time the other cart was back on the road. Suddenly, a great flash split the sky. What sounded like thunder followed. Beyond the hills, the sky grew dark.

"Looks like big rain in the city," said the old man.

"If we had hurried, we'd be almost sold out by now," grumbled his son.

"Take it easy ... you'll last longer. And you'll enjoy life so much more," counseled the kind old gentlemen.

It was late in the afternoon by the time they got to the hill overlooking the city. They stopped and stared down at it for a long time. Neither of them said a word. Finally, the young man put his hand on his father's shoulder and said, "I see what you mean Dad."

They turned their cart around and began to roll slowly away from what had once been the city of Hiroshima.

 

 


"The Hand"
Author Unknown
Condensed Chicken Soup for the Soul

(From our November #2 Issue)

"What you're thankful for"

A Thanksgiving Day editorial in the newspaper told of a school teacher who asked her class of first-graders to draw a picture of something they were thankful for. 

She thought of how little these children from poor neighborhoods actually had to be thankful for. But she knew that most of them would draw pictures of turkeys or tables with food. 

The teacher was taken aback with the picture Douglas handed in...a simple childishly drawn hand.

But whose hand? The class was captivated by the abstract image. "I think it must be the hand of God that brings us food," said one child. "A farmer," said another, "because he grows the turkeys." 

Finally when the others were at work, the teacher bent over Douglas' desk and asked whose hand it was. "It's your hand, Teacher," he mumbled.

She recalled that frequently at recess she had taken Douglas, a scrubby forlorn child, by the hand. She often did that with the children. But it meant so much to Douglas. Perhaps this was everyone's Thanksgiving, not for the material things given to us but for the chance, in whatever small way, to give to others.

 

 


"Peace"
Author Unknown

(From our December #1 Issue)

What does Peace really mean?

There once was a King who offered a prize to the artist who would paint the best picture of peace. Many artists tried. The King looked at all the pictures, but there were only two he really liked and he had to choose between them.

One picture was of a calm lake. The lake was a perfect mirror, for peaceful towering mountains were all around it. Overhead was a blue sky with fluffy white clouds. All who saw this picture thought that it was a perfect picture of peace.

The other picture had mountains too. But these were rugged and bare. Above was an angry sky from which rain fell and in which lightening played. Down the side of the mountain tumbled a foaming waterfall. This did not look peaceful at all. But when the King looked, he saw behind the waterfall a tiny bush growing in a crack in the rock. In the bush a mother bird had built her nest. There, in the midst of the rush of angry water, sat the mother bird on her nest... perfect peace.

Which picture do you think won the prize?

The King chose the second picture. "Because," explained the King, "peace does not mean to be in a place where there is no noise, trouble, or hard work. Peace means to be in the midst of all those things and still be calm in your heart. That is the real meaning of peace."

 


"Kindness of a Stranger"
Author Unknown

(From our December #2 Issue)

Responding to the needs of others with kindness and compassion.

It was a bitter, cold evening in northern Virginia many years ago. The old man's beard was glazed by winter's frost while he waited for a ride across the river. The wait seemed endless. His body became numb and stiff from the frigid north wind.

He heard the faint, steady rhythm of approaching hooves galloping along the frozen path. Anxiously, he watched as several horsemen rounded the bend. He let the first one pass by without an effort to get his attention. Then another passed by, and another. Finally, the last rider neared the spot where the old man sat like a snow statue. As this one drew near, the old man caught the rider's eye and said, "Sir, would you mind giving an old man a ride to the other side? There doesn't appear to be a passageway by foot."

Reining his horse, the rider replied, "Sure thing. Hop aboard." Seeing the old man was unable to lift his half-frozen body from the ground, the horseman dismounted and helped the old man onto the horse. The horseman took the old man not just across the river, but to his destination, which was just a few miles away.

As they neared the tiny but cozy cottage, the horseman's curiosity caused him to inquire, "Sir, I notice that you let several other riders pass by without making an effort to secure a ride. Then I came up and you immediately asked me for a ride. I'm curious why, on such a bitter winter night, you would wait and ask the last rider. What if I had refused and left you there?"

The old man lowered himself slowly down from the horse, looked the rider straight in the eyes, and replied, "I've been around these here parts for some time. I reckon I know people pretty good." The old-timer continued, "I looked into the eyes of the other riders and immediately saw there was no concern for my situation. It would have been useless even to ask them for a ride. But when I looked into your eyes, kindness and compassion were evident. I knew, then and there, that your gentle spirit would welcome the opportunity to give me assistance in my time of need."

Those heartwarming comments touched the horseman deeply. "I'm most grateful for what you have said," he told the old man. "May I never get too busy in my own affairs that I fail to respond to the needs of others with kindness and compassion."

With that, Thomas Jefferson turned his horse around and made his way back to the White House.


 

 

 

 

A Full Year of Writing Prompts
From our 2005 Newsletters

We present you here with the entire collection of Writing Prompts from our 2005 newsletters.  As always, feel free to change, adapt, or adjust these writing prompts to fit your class and students.  You can scroll through these, or click the quicklinks below to jump to a particular month & issue:
December #2 December #1 November #2 November #1
October #2 October #1 September #2 September #1
August #2

 

10 Days Of Writing Prompts
(December #2 Issue) 

Day
1

If you could travel anyplace over the holidays, where would you go and why?

Day
2

How are you going to spend your time during your holiday break?

Day
3

If you could invent a candy bar, what would you put in its ingredients?

Day
4

Design a writing prompt for covering today's inforamation from class.

Day
5

What holidays does your family celebrate?  What special things do you do as a family?

Day
6

If you could be any character in a video game, who would you be and why?

Day
7

What are FIVE things you would do with One Million Dollars?

Day
8

What would you do if you had magical powers?

Day
9

If you could be any stuffed animal, what would you be and why?

Day
10

Create a FIVE question multiple choice quiz to cover the information from today's class.

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(December #1 Issue)

Day
1

List FOUR things you could HELP someone else do during the holidays.

Day
2

Why is the holiday season a time for generosity between people?  Give THREE examples to support your answer.

Day
3

If you could totally design the holiday feast, what would you eat and why?

Day
4

Why is it important to help people during the holiday season?

Day
5

Describe FIVE important pieces of information you learned today in class.

Day
6

Write a letter to Santa.  Why do you deserve the items on your list?

Day
7

Is it better to GIVE or to RECEIVE?  Defend your answer with THREE examples

Day
8

What is meant by 'Goodwill'?  How do people show this during the holidays?

Day
9

Describe your favorite holiday treat.  Why do you like it so much?

Day
10

Create a FIVE question true & false quiz to cover the information from today's class.

 

10 Days Of Writing Prompts
(November #2 issue) 

Day
1

What are three things you are thankful for?

Day
2

Describe how you can show you are thankful for the things in your life.

Day
3

Why do Americans celebrate Thanksgiving?

Day
4

Create a FIVE question multiple choice quiz to cover the information from today's class.

Day
5

Why is it important to SHOW  others you are thankful for them?

Day
6

Why should people be honest when dealing with others?

Day
7

Why is it important to tell the truth?  Give THREE reasons.

Day
8

Describe FOUR ways you can show your honesty in your daily life.

Day
9

List FIVE important facts you learned today in class.

Day
10

What is your definition of 'honesty'?  How can you show you're honest?

 

10 Days Of Writing Prompts 
(November #1 Issue)

Day
1

Why do some kids become bullies?

Day
2

What are TWO ways to positively react to a bully?

Day
3

How can you keep yourself from being a bully?

Day
4

What are five things you can do to be more helpful at home?

Day
5

Create a FIVE question short quiz to cover the information from today's class.

Day
6

Why is it important to be respectful to school secretaries?

Day
7

Describe two ways you can show respect to the adults in your school?

Day
8

Why do your school's custodial/maintenance staff deserve great amounts of respect?

Day
9

What are THREE things you learned in class today?  What is ONE thing you want to know more about?

Day
10

What are THREE ways you can influence your classmates to be respectful to a substitute teacher?

 

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(June #2 Issue)

Day
1

What is your definition of SUCCESS?  Give at least THREE examples.

Day
2

Why is it important to be successful?  What makes a person a 'success'?

Day
3

How can you show that you will be a successful person?  List FIVE ways.

Day
4

Describe, and give examples, of TWO real life persons you know who are successful.  What makes them successful?

Day
5

Write down THREE goals that will help you be successful next year in school.

Day
6

Create FOUR short writing topics that deal with success.

Day
7

What are TWO important lessons we learned in class?  What is ONE question you still need answered?

Day
8

Is SUCCESS a destination, or a journey?  Why do you think so?

Day
9

Brainstorm 10 ways you can be successful in life

Day
10

Create THREE multiple-choice questions based on what we learned today, and then answer them in complete sentences.

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(June #1 Issue)

Day
1

Describe FIVE important aspects of your dream job

Day
2

Why is it important to show loyalty in your job?

Day
3

How can you show that you are a trustworthy person?  List THREE ways.

Day
4

What is your definition of TRUST?  How do you fit into your own definition?

Day
5

Create THREE questions based on what we learned today, and then answer them in complete sentences.

Day
6

Create a short story that describes how a molecule of water moves through the water cycle.

Day
7

What did you understand the best from today's lesson?  What did you understand the least?

Day
8

If you could be any animal, what would you be and why?

Day
9

Brainstorm 15 different types of animals that live around your home.

Day
10

What are the FIVE best reasons to have summer break?

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(May #1 Issue)

Day
1

Describe FIVE characteristics of a true friend.

Day
2

Why is it important to be honest with your friends?  Explain.

Day
3

If you were in a difficult situation, which of your friends would you want with you?  Why?.

Day
4

Describe a real-life situation where friendship is important.

Day
5

What are THREE ways you can show loyalty to your friends?.

Day
6

What did you understand the BEST about today's lesson in class?

Day
7

Create a FIVE question, Multiple-choice quiz covering today's information from class.

Day
8

Describe your best friend.  Why is this person so important to your life?

Day
9

Brainstorm 15 traits that describe a friend.

Day
10

What are five ways you can be a better friend to people around your school?

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(April #2 Issue)

Day
1

What are your FIVE favorite activities to do in the spring?

Day
2

Would you rather have a snow day in the winter, or be finished with school earlier in the summer?  Explain.

Day
3

If you could travel anyplace in the world during spring time, where would you go and why?

Day
4

Describe a real-life job that could use what we learned in class today.

Day
5

Why is getting fresh air and being outdoors important to your daily health?  Brainstorm 10 reasons.

Day
6

Why is it important to use the information you learn in school in real life?

Day
7

Brainstorm a web showing reasons for doing well at the end of the school year.

Day
8

Describe THREE academic goals for yourself before the end of the school year.  How will you achieve each?

Day
9

Create 5 'did you know' trivia statements that cover today's class information.

Day
10

What are FIVE ways you can do better in your school classes?  Explain each.

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(April #1 Issue)

Day
1

What is the greatest challenge you've ever had to face?

Day
2

Why is communication important for a team to function?

Day
3

Why does a group or team need direction?  Give FIVE reasons.

Day
4

Create THREE writing topics that will review today's class information.

Day
5

Why is every member of a team accountable for the team's success or failure?

Day
6

Why is it important to eat right?

Day
7

What different foods do people eat in the spring compared to the winter?

Day
8

Describe THREE fitness goals for yourself.

Day
9

Create a 5 question TRUE/FALSE quiz about what you learned today in class.  Then answer each question.

Day
10

What are FIVE ways you can eat better in the next week?

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(March #2 Issue)

Day
1

Why is TEAMWORK important?  How is teamwork used in schools?

Day
2

Brainstorm 5 ways that you can encourage people to work together.

Day
3

Describe, and give examples, of a real-life job that requires TEAMWORK.

Day
4

Create THREE writing topics that will review today's class information.

Day
5

Describe the steps necessary to build a group of people into a team.

Day
6

List 10 positive rewards from working in a team.

Day
7

Why can people accomplish more as a team than they could individually?  Describe THREE examples.

Day
8

How can teamwork overcome bigger challenges than working alone can?

Day
9

Create a 5 question, TRUE or FALSE quiz about what you learned today in class.  Then answer them.

Day
10

What is your toughest class?  Give 5 reasons why it is your most difficult class.

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(March #1 Issue)

Day
1

What is your definition of a HERO?  Who has been a HERO to you?

Day
2

Brainstorm 5 ways that you can show courage as a student in school

Day
3

Describe, and give examples, of a real-life job that requires BRAVERY.

Day
4

Create THREE writing topics that will review today's class information.

Day
5

Why are HEROES important to our culture?

Day
6

Why is it important to stand up for what you believe is right?

Day
7

Why is it important for us as a culture to celebrate holidays like St. Patrick's Day?

Day
8

How can you show you are a BRAVE person?  List 10 ways, and then prioritize them.

Day
9

Write down THREE questions about something you learned today in class.  Then answer them.

Day
10

What is your favorite holiday?  Give 5 reasons why it is your favorite.

 

10 Days Of Writing  Prompts 
(February #2 Issue)

Day
1

What was one important piece of new information we learned today?

Day
2

Create 5 "Did You Know" trivia statements that cover today's class information.

Day
3

Describe a real life job that could use what we learned today in class.

Day
4

Write a short, 5 question quiz (with answers) that covers today's information.

Day
5

How can we use what we learned today in our daily lives?

Day
6

What is meant by HONESTY?  How do you show your honesty every day?

Day
7

Describe why it is important to be HONEST during test taking situations.

Day
8

How do you show you are an HONEST person?  List 10 ways, and then prioritize them.

Day
9

Brainstorm 10 jobs that require all of their employees to show HONESTY.

Day
10

Describe why it is important to be HONEST with your family and parents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expected Behaviors of a Good Listener

Feel free to print these out and use,
or change them to fit your own preferences

 
Rule 1 Look At The Speaker. 

This is a no-brainer. The audience is there to watch and listen to the speaker, and attention is mandatory.

Rule 2 Keep Your Hands Still. 

Free hands are unable to tap pencils, rustle paper, or drop spare change on a tile floor.

Rule 3 Never Talk When The Speaker Is Talking. 

This one again seems obvious. The audience is there to listen to the speaker, not to listen to another member of the audience.

Rule 4 Never Distract The Speaker. 

This is supported by the previous rules, but will also cover other situations. The audience should not make faces or body gestures that detract from the speaker's ability to present.

Rule 5 Keep Questions, Comments, And Laughter To Appropriate Times And Levels. 

Students will often have questions and comments about the presentations, and these are best posed at the end of the presentation. There will also be instances where funny things will happen or humor is used by the speaker. It is ok for the kids to laugh at these times (it's ok for the teacher to laugh too).  Just remind students that laughter, as well as questions and comments, needs to be kept to an appropriate level, and not to carry on with it.

 

 

Coming Soon 

 

 

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